Two Types Of Diabetes & How They Differ

There are two types of diabetes, which consists of Type I and Type II. It is important to understand the distinction between the two and how both are treated.

Type 1 diabetes is commonly found in children and/or adolescents, but may also occur in adults. With type 1 diabetes, there is almost always a complete deficiency of insulin. As a result, the most common treatment is insulin injections, a lifestyle that consists of both diet and exercise and regular monitoring of blood glucose levels with the use of blood testing monitors. Patients who have been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes can continue to enjoy a normal life providing they continue with their treatment and take special care to follow their doctor’s instructions and/or recommendation.

With type 2 diabetes, an individual’s insulin level is usually either normal or sometimes even elevated, but is not deficient. This form of diabetes is believed to be more complicated than type 1, but ironically is thought to be easier to treat. Because insulin is still being produced inside the body, type 2 diabetes often goes undetected for years. Symptoms are milder and may even be sporadic, which often reduces the level of concern. The main problem with type 2 diabetes going unnoticed is the potential for serious complications, including renal failure and coronary artery disease. The initial treatment phase of type 2 diabetes will likely include a lifestyle adjustment to feature increased physical activity and a diet that is geared toward weight loss. The next step, if necessary, will be medication and possibly insulin therapy if needed.

Both types of diabetes require that the patient maintain normal blood glucose levels in an effort to reduce the possibility of organ damage, including eyesight, kidney, blood circulation, etc. In order for this to occur, patients must carefully monitor their food intake and make sure to participate in regular exercise, all the while continuing to monitor their blood glucose level.

As of 2006, there is no known cure for diabetes. A chronic disease that effects many, diabetes is best treated through patient education, nutrition, self awareness and long-term care. In addition, patients are often urged to be aware of other symptoms that may indicate complications arising from diabetes.

The contents of this article are to be used for informational purposes only. It should not be used in conjunction with, or in place of, professional medical advice relating to diabetes. This article must not be used as a basis for diagnosing or treating diabetes, but rather an informational source designed to explain the difference between the two types. For further information, a diagnosis or recommended treatment method for diabetes, individuals should consult a licensed physician.

Discover how to prevent it developing into type 2 diabetes

Pre-diabetes means you probably have higher than normal blood-sugar levels but, fortunately, not high enough to be classed as being diabetic.

However it does mean that you are susceptible to developing type 2 diabetes and heart disease if you do nothing about it.

Unfortunately, more often than not, there are no physical symptoms to warn you if you are in a pre-diabetes stage. So it’s worth getting yourself checked out and, if you fall into any of these categories, ask your physician if you are likely to be at risk of pre-diabetes:

* You are overweight and you are aged 45 or older

* Your weight is OK and you’re aged 45+. Ask your doctor during a routine check-up if testing is appropriate for you

* You are an adult under age 45 and you are overweight

* You have high blood pressure; low HDL cholesterol and high triglycerides

* Your family has a history of diabetes

* There’s a history of gestational diabetes in your family

* You have given birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds

* You belong to an ethnic or minority group that has a high risk for diabetes, such as African American, American Indian, Asian American, Pacific Islander, or Hispanic American/Latino.

The good news is, if after testing you discover that you do have pre-diabetes; your blood-sugar levels are rather higher than they should be but not in the diabetes range, you can take positive action to reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

* Reduce the amount on your plate – eating just a little less helps reduce your risk factor.

* Avoid snacks; if you must snack go for a healthy rather than sugar-laden option.

* Drink a glass of water 10 minutes before eating to take the edge of your appetite so you don’t overindulge in food.

* Choose whole-grain foods or sugar-free foods.

* Take a little more exercise; such as walking up the stairs instead of taking the lift or an escalator.

* Don’t shop for food when you are feeling hungry. You’ll be more tempted to buy the foods that increase your blood-sugars; add on weight and generally create a higer risk of moving from your pre-diabetes state into being a fully diagnosed type 2 diabetic.

Taking these and other simple actions can reduce your risk of turning pre-diabetes into type 2 diabetes.

Sopranos Star Takes Control Of Diabetes

Aida Turturro, the actress who plays Janice Soprano on the HBO series “The Sopranos,” is one of the more than 20 million Americans who have diabetes.

Turturro was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (where the body does not produce enough insulin or the cells do not use the insulin properly) in 2000. For more than a year after her initial diagnosis she was in denial and did not take the proper steps-such as diet and exercise-to manage the disease.

Finally, her doctor told her that her blood sugar levels were too high and if she did not learn how to manage the disease, she would suffer serious complications.

“As soon as I started learning more about the potential complications of the disease, I realized I should have taken action sooner,” said Turturro. “It is scary what can happen to you if you do not take control of your diabetes.”

Turturro was among the more than 50 percent of diabetes patients whose A1C levels are above the target goal of 7 percent as established by the American Diabetes Association. Patients with diabetes should know their A1C level. It is a simple blood test that assesses glucose levels over a two- to three-month period.

In addition to her diet and exercise routines, Turturro worked with her doctor to develop a treatment regimen that was right for her. At first she was taking oral medications but was still unable to get her blood sugar levels under control. About two years ago, Turturro and her doctor added Lantus® (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection), the once-daily, true 24-hour basal insulin, to her treatment plan.

With a treatment regimen that includes Lantus and other diabetes medications, Turturro achieves good blood glucose control with an A1C level below seven percent.

“Managing diabetes is not easy. What I have learned is the best way to manage the disease is by becoming educated, motivated and an advocate for yourself,” said Turturro. “It is a 24-hour disease and you have to put in a real effort to keep your blood sugar levels under control.”

Note to Editors: Important Safety Information for Lantus

Lantus is indicated for once-daily subcutaneous administration, at the same time each day, for the treatment of adult and pediatric patients (6 years and older) with type 1 diabetes mellitus or adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who require basal (long-acting) insulin for the control of hyperglycemia. Lantus must not be diluted or mixed with any other insulin or solution. If mixed or diluted, the solution may become cloudy, and the onset of action/time to peak effect may be altered in an unpredictable manner. Lantus is contraindicated in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or the excipients. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse effect of insulin, including Lantus. As with all insulins, the timing of hypoglycemia may differ among various insulin formulations. Glucose monitoring is recommended for all patients with diabetes. Any change of insulin type and/or regimen should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision.Concomitant oral antidiabetes treatment may need to be adjusted. Other adverse events commonly associated with Lantus include the following: lipodystrophy, skin reactions (such as injection-site reaction, pruritus, rash) and allergic reactions.